Top June Recalls: Children’s Sleepwear and Household Goods

Children’s Sleepwear and Household Goods Top June Recalls

The CPSC announced 24 recalls in June, of which, five (21%) were children’s products. Almost half (46%) were for Home & Garden products, and the rest were a mix of Sports & Recreation products as well as hardware, tools and building supply products.

Three of the five children’s product recalls were for sleepwear that failed to meet the federal flammability standards. One incident was reported, in which a 9-year old boy’s garment caught fire, causing severe burns to the front and back of both legs. In total, 228,000 pajamas, bottoms and sleep-sets were recalled in June.  Boys and Girls styles from sizes 12 months to Youth 14 are affected. Check yours and find out how to get a refund or exchange here: http://wemakeitsafer.com/Sleepwear-Loungewear-Recalls

The other two children’s product recalls were for baby and toddler gear. The first, an Evenflo convertible high chair,  was recalled because the tray can unexpectedly detach and allow a child to fall.  There were 18 reports of trays detaching, including 8 reports of children who fell.  The other was for Kolcraft strollers  that were recalled because a child or adult’s finger can get caught in the hinge mechanism, posing an amputation and laceration hazard.  There were 5 reported incidents at the time of recall, including 3 children whose fingertips were amputated and 2 adults whose fingers were smashed or lacerated.

The recall with the highest number of units in June was for a Flushmate toilet flushing system.  Over 2 million units of the flushing system, which have been installed in toilets since 1997, were recalled because it can burst, causing the tank lid to lift and the tank to shatter. This product caused the most incidents of property damage among June recalls, including 304 reports of the system bursting and 14 injuries at the time of recall.

Two other recalls topped 100,000 units.  880,000 units of Cryofreeze gel packs  were recalled because they can leak gel that can cause illness if ingested.  No incidents or injuries were reported at time of recall; however, the same product was previously recalled with lunch food carriers and children’s lunch boxes, and in one of those cases, it was reported  that two pets were injured or killed by ingesting the gel.

The last recall to top 100,000 units was also the recall with the highest number of incidents this month, Black & Decker Spacemaker coffeemakers.   The recall involved 159,000 coffeemaker units, which were recalled because the handle on the coffee pot can break, causing cuts and burns to the consumer.  At the time of recall, there were 1,276 reports of the handle breaking and 68 reports of burns and/or cuts. The number of incidents reported at the time of recall is statistically significant in terms of both incidents per units sold (0.8%) and the average number of incidents reported per month that the product was on the market (27.1), which average around 0.3% and 1.5 for CPSC recalls, respectively.

Other recalls in June included light fixtures, furniture, bikes, exercise equipment, spas, tools and industry supplies.  See all the latest recalls and register your product for recall alerts at WeMakeItSafer.com

About the Author

Jennifer Toney is CEO at WeMakeItSafer.com, a company that builds web applications to help consumers and retailers check and monitor products for safety recalls. After finding more than her fair share of recalled products in her own home, Jennifer founded WeMakeItSafer to help families and store owners identify dangerous products more easily. You can follow Jennifer on twitter at @Jennifer_Toney and WeMakeItSafer on facebook at http://facebook.com/WeMakeItSafer

Children’s Product Recalls Higher in May

Guest post by:

Jennifer Toney, CEO at WeMakeItSafer.com

Children’s Product Recalls Higher in May

The CPSC announced 29 recalls in May, four more than this time last year (25). Of the recalls issued, 13 or 45%, were children’s products. This is slightly higher than the overall average for children’s products, which is 43%.  Most of the remaining recalls were for products in the Home & Garden (8) and Sporting Goods (5) categories.

The biggest recall of the month, in terms of units, was for Kennedy Home Collection folding step stools ( http://wemakeitsafer.com/Kennedy-Home-Collection-Folding-Step-Stools-Recall-422012-978565 ) with 1.6 million units involved.  The stools were recalled because they can break or collapse when in use, posing a fall hazard.  15 incidents were reported at the time of recall, resulting in three injuries.

Another children’s product, Safety 1st toilet locks and cabinet latches ( http://wemakeitsafer.com/Safety-1st-Toilet-and-Cabinet-Locks-Recall-591275-235602 ), resulted in 388 incident reports, the highest in May.  868,000 units were recalled due to lock failure, allowing children unintended access to water and dangerous items.  One injury was reported.

A third children’s product recall involved a relatively high number of both units and incidents.  330,000 Tots in Mind crib tents ( http://wemakeitsafer.com/Tots-in-Mind-Crib-Tents-Recall-228172-161506 ) and play yard tents ( http://wemakeitsafer.com/Tots-in-Mind-Play-Yard-Tents-Recall-043518-552326 ) were recalled because they can pose an entrapment and strangulation hazard.  23 incidents were reported at the time of recall, resulting in four injuries, one of them a two year old boy who sustained a catastrophic brain injury when the crib tent affixed to his crib tent inverted and a broken rod trapped him at the neck.  The play yard tents were previously recalled ( http://wemakeitsafer.com/Cozy-Indoor-Outdoor-Portable-Playard-Tents-Plus-Cabana-Kits-Recall-120331-904389 ) in July 2010, at which time four incidents had been reported, including one involving the death of a two-year old boy.  Consumers should not attempt to repair these products and should instead return them to the retailer.

Two trampolines were recalled in May.  One of them, a Sportspower BouncePro 14-foot trampoline ( http://wemakeitsafer.com/Sportspower-BouncePro-14-foot-Trampolines-Recall-399921-274055 ) (92,000 units) included 17 reported incidents of the surrounding net breaking, resulting  in 11 injuries, the highest number of reported injuries for any recall in May.   The other was for a small, First Fitness “Kid’s First Trampoline”  ( http://wemakeitsafer.com/First-Fitness-Trampolines-with-Handlebars-Recall-341991-833113 ) recalled by Aqua-Leisure.  There had been four reported incidents of the handlebar breaking but no injuries had been reported at the time of recall.

One recall, the Banzai inflatable pool slide ( http://wemakeitsafer.com/Banzai-Inflatable-Pool-Slides-Recall-456322-573971 ) (21,000 units), reported three severe injuries, including one that resulted in a 24-year old man being paralyzed, and another that resulted in the death of a 29-year old woman .  The slides were recalled because they can deflate, allowing a user to hit the ground underneath the slide. The slides are also unstable and carry inadequate warnings and instructions.  Consumers should immediately stop using the slides and return them to Walmart or Toys R Us for a full refund.

One Home & Garden recall had a high number of incidents, glass sauté pan lids ( http://wemakeitsafer.com/Glass-Lid-Sold-with-Circulon-Cookware-Set-Recall-785275-556084 ) sold with Circulon Cookware sets.  There were 65 reports of broken or shattered lids.  No injuries were reported.

Other children’s recalls included bassinets, car seats, jackets and sweatshirts.  Recalls in other categories included furniture, bicycle parts, climbing gear and more.

Review all of the Latest Recalls, or just the latest Children’s Product Recalls at WeMakeItSafer.com.

About the Author

Jennifer Toney is CEO at WeMakeItSafer.com, a company that builds web applications to help consumers and retailers check and monitor products for safety recalls. After finding more than her fair share of recalled products in her own home, Jennifer founded WeMakeItSafer to help families and store owners identify dangerous products more easily. You can follow Jennifer on twitter at @Jennifer_Toney and WeMakeItSafer on facebook at http://facebook.com/WeMakeItSafer

Freezer Packs, High Chairs and Bike Trailers Top January’s Recall List

Guest post by:

Jennifer Toney, CEO at WeMakeItSafer.com

The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) announced 25 recalls in January, including one expansion of a previously recalled bicycle. While that is slightly more than the 23 recalls we saw in December, it is still lower than we typically see this time of year.  Over the past five years, the CPSC has issued an average of 33 recalls in January.  It is still too early to predict a decline in recalls for 2012, but we will be watching closely.

Of the 25 products recalled by the CPSC in January, eight, or 32%, were children’s products.  Three of those products topped 100,000 units recalled, including Lunch Kits, High Chairs and Bicycle Trailers.

California Innovations (a Canadian company) recalled soft-pack lunch boxes [http://wemakeitsafer.com/Ci-Sport-Expandable-Insulated-Lunch-Box-with-Freezer-Gel-Pack-Recall-730784-365361%5D and insulated food carriers [http://wemakeitsafer.com/Travelin-Chef-Expandable-Thermal-Food-Carrier-Recall-242836-671370%5D because the freezer packs that were included with the containers are filled with toxic gel. The gel freezer packs are either blue or clear plastic with blue gel. The word “Cryofreeze” is printed on the outside.

While no children were reported to have been injured, the company received two separate reports of dogs chewing the packs, causing injury to one and death to the other. Consumers are urged to dispose of the packs in accordance with federal, state and/or local regulations.

IKEA recalled 169,000 ANTILOP high chairs  [http://wemakeitsafer.com/IKEA-ANTILOP-High-Chairs-Recall-250628-927806%5D in the US and Canada after receiving eight reports of the buckles coming undone unexpectedly, including three incidents that resulted in falls from the chair. This is the highest number of injuries reported with a January recall. The highchair had been on the market for three years from August 2006 to January 2010, however the announcement did not include any information regarding when the incident reports were received.

Chariot Carriers, a division of Thule, recalled bicycle trailers [http://wemakeitsafer.com/Chariot-Bicycle-Trailers- and-Bicycle-Trailer-Conversion-Kits-Recall-289381-202137] and conversion kits because the hitch can detach from the bicycle.  This is another case where the product had not been sold for more than a year.  The last time the company sold the item new was in August 2010, so be especially diligent to check your trailer if you have owned it for a while or purchased it secondhand.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) also issued a children’s product recall in January. The recall, for Britax Chaperone infant car seats, was the first child restraint recalled by the agency in nearly a year.  The Chaperone carriers were recalled due to a problem with the harness adjuster that causes the straps to not work properly. Earlier models [http://wemakeitsafer.com/Chaperone-Infant-car-seats-Recall-368195-531761%5Dof Chaperone infant car seat were recalled in 2010 to replace a faulty chest clip.

Other child-related recalls in January included toys, furniture and helmets. You can view the complete list of recent children’s product recalls here: http://wemakeitsafer.com/Childrens-All-Kid-Baby-Recalls

The remaining, non-children’s product recalls span several categories from flashlights and lamps to golf carts and snowmobiles. Of note, there were also four recalls of adult bicycles [http://wemakeitsafer.com/Bicycles-Bikes-Accessories-Recalls%5D in January, so if you are getting ready to dust off the bike as the weather warms, be sure to check these recalls first.

You can search for the products you own and browse the latest recalls at http://WeMakeItSafer.com

About the Author

Jennifer Toney is CEO at WeMakeItSafer.com, a company that builds web applications to help consumers and retailers check and monitor products for safety recalls. After finding more than her fair share of recalled products in her own home, Jennifer founded WeMakeItSafer to help families and store owners identify dangerous products more easily. You can follow Jennifer on twitter at @Jennifer_Toney and WeMakeItSafer on facebook at http://facebook.com/WeMakeItSafer

Toys, Travel Cases and Tools – December Recalls of Note

Guest post by:

Jennifer Toney, CEO at WeMakeItSafer.com

Three Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) recalls topped 100,000 units in December making them, statistically, the ones most likely to be in your home.  They include the Colorful Hearts Teddy sold by Build-A-Bear Workshop, recalled for eyes that pose a choking hazard; Circo-brand children’s travel suitcases sold at Target, recalled for excess levels of lead; and Rayovac NI-CD Cordless Tool Battery Packs recalled due to risk of explosion.

In each case, as with most recalls, the remedy is relatively simple – stop using the product and return it for a refund or store credit.  Visit the links above for further instructions if you think you may own one of these products.

In terms of risk of injury, one December recall, the Pottery Barn Children’s Bed Canopy, stood out as having a relatively high number of incidents and injuries reported before the recall was announced.

The canopy, sold separately and as part of twin, full and queen-sized beds can fall and strike individuals sleeping or playing in or nearby the bed.  By the time the recall was announced there had been 33 reports of the canopies falling, causing 9 reported minor injuries and one report of an injury severe enough to require stiches.

The canopies were sold for several years, beginning in December 2003. Although there is no information about when the product-failures were reported, the number of incidents and injuries as a percentage of the number of units being recalled is significantly higher than the average recall.

Pottery Barn Kids, a division of Williams-Sonoma, is offering a free repair to canopy owners. More information can be found here.

Another stand-out in terms of incidents reported before recall was a glass dining table sold by West Elm, also a division of Williams-Sonoma.  14 reports of the table collapsing or breaking were received during the product’s short, four-month time on the market.  One minor injury was reported. West Elm is offering full store credit and will pick up the table for free. Learn more here.

Similarly, two recalls of golf cars, hunting and utility vehicles had significant reports of product failure prior to recall, so if you own this type of motorized cart, be sure to check the list.

Other consumer product recalls in December included toys, strollers, children’s sleepwear, women’s shoes, kitchen gadgets, snowmobiles and holiday décor.  You can flip through images of all the latest recalls at http://WeMakeItSafer.com .

About the Author

Jennifer Toney is CEO at WeMakeItSafer.com, a company that builds web applications to help consumers and retailers check and monitor products for safety recalls. After finding more than her fair share of recalled products in her own home, Jennifer founded WeMakeItSafer to help families and store owners identify dangerous products more easily. You can follow Jennifer on twitter at @Jennifer_Toney and WeMakeItSafer on facebook at http://facebook.com/WeMakeItSafer